Tuesday, 27 June 2017

Galway Bay Against Salmon Cages (GBASC) welcomes the decision made on the 19 June by Galway County Council to again refuse planning permission to Bradán Beo Teo

GALWAY BAY AGAINST SALMON CAGES PRESS RELEASE
26/6/2017
Galway Bay Against Salmon Cages (GBASC) welcomes the decision made on the 19 June by Galway County Council to again refuse planning permission to Bradán Beo Teo (BBT) for their illegal pump and piping system at Loch an Mhuillinn, Connemara.
This is the second time in 2 years that Galway Co. Council planners have refused planning permission to Bradán Beo Teo for their 5 year illegal development at Loch an Mhuillinn. We would hope that Bradán Beo Teo. would not waste any more of the Council's limited resources by applying a third time for permission for


this unsustainable and environmentally damaging illegal development.
We commend the courageous decision of the Co.Council planners not to reward BBT with planning permission in light of the fact that Bradán Beo Teo, in which Udaras has a major shareholding, had ignored numerous warning letters over 3 years that their development was illegal.
The Council planners have said in their refusal decision letter (attached below), that the development is likely to have significant, adverse impacts on the integrity and qualifying interests/conservation objectives of designated European sites, would contravene materially a policy, objectives and a development management standard contained in the currant Galway County Development Plan, would set an undesirable precedent for similar future development within European sites,and therefore would be contrary to the proper planning and sustainable development of the area.''
A number of illegal fresh water abstractions are taking place from rivers and lakes in salmon farming areas along the Connemara coast as we go to press.
GBASC have in the last two weeks reported 2 possible illegal fresh water abstractions by salmon farmers to Galway Co. Council and the Department of Agriculture,Food and the Marine. One from the Bunowen River flowing into Killary Harbour and another from Loch an Iarainn, Kilkieran Connemara. These suspected and damaging illegal fresh water abstractions of millions of litres per day are being taken from rivers and lakes in drought conditions. (See pictures below)
We ask the public to be on the look out for such unauthorized developments and bring them to the attention of the relevant planning authority in their area. Please see pictures attached below.
Billy Smyth
Chairman, Galway Bay Against Salmon Cages

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Irish high court grants salmon farming licence against minister’s decision

https://www.undercurrentnews.com/2017/06/14/irish-high-court-grants-salmon-farming-licence-against-ministers-decision/

Murphy’s Irish Seafood, a company operating fish farms and hatcheries in Bantry Bay, Ireland, has successfully brought an application for judicial review -- quashing the decision of the minister for agriculture, food and the marine to revoke their licence, Irish Legal News reported.

Justice Marie Baker found that the impugned decision had not been made within the statutory time limit, and that the notice of this revocation did not contain a sufficient statement of the grounds on which the minister was considering to enable representations.

The application for judicial review related to the purported termination of the aquaculture licence held by Murphy’s for an adult salmon site and a smolt site.

Aftermath of storm in 2014

Following a catastrophic storm of hurricane force in February 2014, most of the fish stock -- amounting in total to 235,000 fish -- and almost all of the aquaculture equipment on the site was destroyed.

Since that time, the damaged cages and equipment had been removed, and one cage remaining has been upgraded; the court heard that there were no fish on site at the time of the hearing.

The damage caused by the storm was such that Murphy’s became technically in breach of the conditions of its licence.

In July 2014 Murphy’s reached an agreement to facilitate the ongoing operation of the aquaculture process. The agreement provided for submission, on or before July 31 2014, of a maintenance and recording program in accordance with a Norwegian standard.

Salmon farmers ‘put wild fish at risk’ in fight to kill off sea lice

A ballan wrasse devours a crab. Concern is growing over their falling numbers in the wild. Photograph: Marevision/Getty Images/age fotostock RM
Sourced from: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/10/salmon-farmers-put-wild-wrasse-at-risk--sea-lice-scotland-anglers#img-1

Salmon farmers have been accused of playing dirty by using fish caught in the wild to clean lice from Scottish fish farms. Marine conservation experts say that shipping tonnes of English-caught wrasse a year – to tackle lice infestations in salmon pens north of the border – is endangering natural stocks. English anglers have also warned wrasse is becoming harder and harder to find in local waters.

However, salmon farmers have rejected the charge. They say the use of wrasse as a “cleaner” fish is part of a long-term plan to replace chemicals – which are currently administered to pens to control lice infestations – with sustainable, biological controls.

Fishermen remain concerned, nevertheless. “Wrasse play a role in keeping the marine ecosystem in balance,” said David Mitchell, of the Angling Trust. “We simply do not know what will be the consequence of removing so many of them from our coastal waters.”

More than 170,000 tonnes of salmon a year are grown in Scotland at more than 200 marine farms. However, production is affected by lice infestations that cause lesions and secondary infections in the fish. Chemicals can control this but pollute water around the farms. Another solution is provided by wrasse which feed on marine insects. Many species – such as ballan and goldsinny wrasse – will eat lice that infect larger fish. As a result wild wrasse are being caught in pots and shipped to Scotland to tackle sea-lice infestations. One wrasse for every 25 salmon is used.

But this exploitation of wrasse is raising concerns. “We are very worried that a large local fishery has developed rapidly over the past couple of years – with large numbers of wrasse being taken from local waters – without proper management or any indication of its sustainability,” said Samuel Stone, of the Marine Conservation Society. “It is a real concern.”

A similar line is taken by the Angling Trust, which is particularly concerned that wrasse are killed after they have completed their lice-devouring activities. Wrasse caught by anglers are usually put back in the sea and the Angling Trust said it was receiving more and more reports from anglers who had found very few wrasse left in their local waters, particularly around south-west England.

“Wrasse are very popular and many young people take up angling as a hobby after fishing for them,” said Mark Lloyd, chief executive of the Angling Trust. “They put the wrasse back in the water because they are not particularly appetising. By contrast, those that are being shipped north are killed and discarded after they have done their work cleaning lice and that is causing real problems of depletion. It is also a waste of protein.”

The fear that wild wrasse populations are shrinking badly is backed by researchers in Norway, where wrasse-catching to supply fish farming has also soared in recent years. According to a report in New Scientist, annual wrasse catches have risen from 2m to 22m in less than a decade to supply Norwegian salmon farms with cleaner fish. However, this was matched by considerable depletion of wrasse stocks where fishing took place.

Conservationists and anglers are now calling for a number of measures to be introduced to tackle the issue. In particular, they want careful monitoring of wrasse numbers to be introduced and strict limits imposed on catches.

However, the danger posed to wrasse stocks was dismissed by Scott Landsburgh, chief executive of the Scottish Salmon Producers’ Organisation. “The fishermen who supply us with wrasse do not take away juveniles or brood stock, so at the end of the day stock should always recover. And we simply do not have any hard figures that show serious depletion in going on.”

He said that the industry – which employs around 2,200 people – was also moving towards wrasse sustainability. “We have set up farms for both wrasse and lumpfish, which also eat lice, and the aim is that we will produce our own cleaner fish from our own farms in a few years,” he told the Observer.

It remains to be seen how successful this will be. Some marine conservation experts have questioned the potential usefulness of wrasse raised in farms as cleaner fish compared with those taken from the wild. Landsburgh remained confident. “We are spending a great deal of money on this. I am not worried.”