Monday, 18 September 2017

Irish Examiner: High-rise fish hold solutions

http://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/outdoors/donal-hickey/high-rise-fish-hold-solutions-459134.html

It may sound like a tall order, but the solution to rows about ocean-based fish farms could well be up in the sky. Fish are being reared successfully in plastic fish tanks containing 80,000 litres of salt water, 15 floors up on a high-rise building in Hong Kong, where people have voracious appetites for fish. The idea is also catching on in other parts of Asia.

Earlier this year, vehement opposition was voiced at an oral planning hearing into plans by a Norwegian company, Marine Harvest, for a salmon farm off Shot Head, in Bantry Bay, Co Cork. Twelve appeals were lodged against a decision by the Department of Agriculture to licence the project in an area of just over 100 acres.
Due to ongoing concerns about pollution from fish farms, sea lice and threats to wild fish, there’s been a movement, internationally, towards on-land fish farms in recent years. More than 10,000 such farms are now in operation, Fish Farm News reports.
Louis Luyken, of the Save Bantry Bay group, says nobody in the area wants salmon farms which have “the wrong fish in the wrong places”. He says the only way of bringing jobs and wealth is through a big number of fish farms on land over the whole country.
These would include special, closed containment systems and closed buildings in which the water would be biologically cleaned and waste used as fertiliser on the land for other production by the same farmers, he adds. On-land fish farms use a recirculating aquaculture system described by the industry as an eco-friendly, land-based fish tank.
Denmark, for instance, has half its farms on this system, while Finland has never allowed fish farms on its seas.
Two years ago, a report for the Irish fish- farming industry shot down on-land farms, claiming capital costs would be too high and would make it difficult to be competitive. Environmentalists and others, however, remain unconvinced and will continue with campaigns similar to Save Bantry Bay.
The vertical fish farms in Hong Kong are being put on rooftops because land there is really scarce. White-fleshed grouper fish are being produced to supply a huge local market.
Oceanethix, one of the companies involved, produces about two tonnes of grouper per week and is also selling its water-recycling systems to other companies across Asia setting up so-called fish farms in the sky.
Also, a growing number of organic fruit and vegetable plots are being created on top of skyscrapers and other spare rooftop spaces in bustling Hong Kong.
Nevertheless it’s safe to say it will be a long time before we see such activity on the roof of Cork County Hall, or the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin.